Canada COVID-19 Charting

updated on waiting …

These charts track the progress of COVID-19 in Canada by province and should be updated daily at 8pm EST.

The data is sourced from the Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering.

These charts are inspired by the excellent COVID-19 charts created by the Financial Times.

You can look at the charts for the US here.

Important note about the charts below: the numbers reported on a given day can be wrong depending on what time the researcher at John Hopkins looks up and records the COVID-19 case data for a given day and the time that a province reports the numbers for that day. While the numbers for a given day may be innaccuate this is normally fixed on the next reporting day and the overall trend of the graphs is not adversely affected.

Canada compared to other countries

Looking at 9 different countries to see how the Canada compares.

In this new cases per week graph each point represents a sum of cases over the last seven days. Each succesive point moves this 7 day sum one day over droping the first day and adding the current day. This moving sum smooths out the curve and helps provide a better indicator as to wether the curve is flattening.


The lines in the graph above will flatten and curve downward as the new cases slow down and reduce for the given country. Look to line for South Korea as a good example of this. Keep in mind that South Korea has had recent experience with epidemics and was extremely agressive with testing.

We are using a logarithmic scale because it reveals the trajectory of the spread more clearly. Take note that values on the Y axis increase exponentially.

As you look at the cumulative cases graph below keep in mind that as the new cases slow down the curve will only flatten as its doing for South Korea.


Deaths from COVID-19

The following graphs are very similar to the graphs above but instead of tracking confirmed cases they track the number of deaths caused by COVID-19 per country.

Keep in mind that deaths can occur three weeks after someone falls ill. So this is a late indicator of what is happening.


Below we see cumulative deaths for each country.


Canada by province

The new cases per week graph below is much like the one at the top of this page except that it compares Canadian provinces instead of countries.


Let’s also look at cumulative cases in the provinces, again measuring the total confirmed cases over time.